Posts Tagged ‘interest rates’

How Interest Rates Affect Your House Payment

November 17th, 2014 at 11:16 am by Rick Schutte

We have experienced historically low interest rates for the past few years making home buying very affordable.  Things are about to change in 2015.  I believe that the Fed. will begin raising the interest rates that they charge the banks, thus affecting home mortgage rates.  I found this chart showing the difference in a house payment at different rates.  Is now still a good time to be considering purchasing or is it better to wait?  In my opinion, now is the most beneficial time to make that purchase if you are considering buying.  I hope this enlightens some of our readers to the benefits of today’s market place.

Home interest rates

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Now Is A Unique Period in History

November 13th, 2012 at 4:11 pm by Rick Schutte

This article is written by one of our experienced agents, Gil Daigle.

I got a flu shot last week. Because it was a workday, I was wearing my nametag, which advertises me as a Realtor®. The nurse who was giving me the shot started to talk about real estate. The conversation started out like all of these conversations do with the nurse asking me “How’s the market?” I gave my stock answer that it could be better and then went on to say what a great time it is to buy real estate. I talked about the depressed prices and the low interest rates. When I was finished, he told me a story.

A Remarkable Story

Last November he and his wife started to invest in real estate. Between November 2011 and April 2012 they purchased four condominiums in Kirkland for $300,000 cash. He went on to tell me that all four are rented and they generate $4,000 a month. After condominium fees and other expenses, the monthly net is $2,500. A very quick and basic calculation indicates this is a 10% return on his investment per year. You might be asking yourself “so what?” The simple answer is where else can you get 10% interest on an investment that will increase in value.

What Other Investments Are Available?

I searched the Internet and discovered the best interest rate you can get for a certificate of deposit is 1.1%. The big catch is you must deposit $25,000. The stock market might be the answer. Unfortunately, the average gain of the Dow Jones Industrial average since 2000 is only 2.57% with the big catch being its wild fluctuations. In 2003, the Dow gained 25.32%; however, in 2008 it lost 33.84%.

Do we all have $300,000 cash on hand to invest? I’m guessing the answer to that is no. However, interest rates are very low even on investment properties. Check with your banker for rate information. Talk to me about the availabilities of property. Whatever your circumstances it make good sense to think about investing in real estate.

If you are a renter, take the plunge and buy. If you have a good credit rating, there are multitudes of financing opportunities available. Talk to your banker and see what works for you. Then talk to me, I’m sure I can find you something you will like.

We Are In A Unique Period of History.

We are in a unique period of history. Since World War I interest rates have been this low only once, between 1933 and 1950. Remembering your U.S. History that was the Great Depression and World War II. Currently the US economy is down and the government is doing everything it can to bring about a recovery. These real estate conditions will not last. Get your piece of the American Dream while is it at its most affordable!

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Top VA Loan Questions From Military Buyers

May 25th, 2012 at 11:08 am by Rick Schutte

Every week, we field a number of questions from our VA buyers regarding VA loan questions.  VA is an outstanding loan program and we would like to make this information available to all of our readers.  Here are some of the top questions we respond to.

Q:  How do I deal with bad credit?

A: Bad credit is a common challenge. In order to qualify for VA financing, military home buyers must have at least a 620 credit score. This minimum can be a stretch for those with a past bankruptcy or foreclosure. We work closely with credit-challenged military buyers. Rather than dismissing applicants with low credit scores we partner with the potential borrowers to help point them in the right direction to repair their credit rating and position themselves to qualify for the loan.

Q: What if my spouse has bad credit?

A: All VA loan borrowers and co-borrowers will be under close scrutiny by a lender. Credit scores for both applicants have to measure up to the 620 minimum. It may be advisable for a potential buyer to obtain a loan without a co-borrower, provided the solo borrower can afford the mortgage payments and meet all criteria.

Q: What can I buy with a VA loan?

A: VA loans can only be used to finance primary residences (up to a 4-plex if the veteran lives in one unit). Vacant land and commercial properties are ineligible. It is possible to finance new construction with a VA loan, but only through certain lenders.

Q:  What are current VA loan rates?

A:  It’s not uncommon for VA loan interest rates to be lower than conventional loan rates. But as with any loan, the interest rate on a VA loan will shift with the market. Borrowers can get a sense of VA rates during the pre approval process.

There are many local lenders and qualified real estate professionals here on Whidbey Island that can help with the VA process.  If you or someone you know has questions that aren’t answered here, there are many available resources available locally. We are proud to serve our military and our veterans.

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For months there has been an ever-growing fear that our economy is headed towards deflation, which is when prices on goods and services are falling lower. Deflation is the exact opposite of inflation, which of course occurs when prices climb higher. Remember, inflation is the arch-enemy of Bonds, so fears of inflation negatively impact Bond prices and home loan rates. But fears of deflation are good for Bonds and home loan rates. That’s because the fixed payment that a Bond provides to an investor goes further in a deflationary environment. So, the recent fears of deflation have helped Bond prices move higher and home loan rates move lower.

But last week, future deflation/inflation expectations changed… and investors in the Bond market started betting that the Fed will be successful in “creating inflation” via their Quantitative Easing plans, and will thus avoid continuing down a deflationary road. This was evidenced by the results of last week’s 5-Year Treasury Inflation Protected Securities (TIPS) auction, which saw investors buying TIPS at a premium since they were confident they’d be able to benefit from the increased inflation that should result from the QE2.

Of course, investors aren’t the only ones impacted by this. The media has already been chattering that the Fed has to be careful not to let inflation get out of control in the coming months and years. In fact, just last week, there was a headline explaining how another round of Quantitative Easing brings the risk of “unleashing the 1970s inflation genie.” Consumers who are looking to purchase or refinance a house should also take note of that possibility – since even talk of inflation can impact home loan rates negatively. After all, a rise in inflation would be bad for Mortgage Bonds and, as a result, for home loan rates.

The good news is that home loan rates are still near historic lows for the time being. If you or someone you know would like to see how you can benefit from the current situation, call or email us today.

Information courtesy of Alaska USA Mortgage

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First-Time homebuyers stoke demand for smaller homes

September 24th, 2010 at 4:06 pm by Rick Schutte
 
 

First-time homebuyers are contributing to an increase in demand for smaller and less expensive new homes, according to research from economists at the National Association of Home Builders (NAHB). Delving into data from the most recent biennial American Housing Survey, which was conducted by the Department of Housing and Urban Development and the Census Bureau in 2009, the study, “Characteristics of New and First-Time Home Buyers,” finds that 41 percent of the 8.4 million households who bought a home between 2007 and 2009 were first-time buyers.

The market share of first-timers was up from 35 percent in both 2005 and 2007. Although some of the demand was fueled by the initial version of the home buyer tax credit in mid-2008, which was specifically targeted to those buying a home for the first time, the upward trend is expected to continue as children of baby boomers – members of a generation that is larger than their parents’ – move into their household formation years in the period ahead.

First-time buyers for the two years of the study had an average age of 34, compared to 46 for those trading up.  The average income of first-timers was over $67,000, about 30 percent below the average household income of trade-up buyers of $97,000. About half of the first-time buyers earned less than $60,000.

The household size of both first-time and trade-up buyers has been declining, while single-person households have been on the rise. First-timers bought homes with an average market value of about $184,000, compared to more than $297,000 for trade-up buyers. First-time buyers bought homes averaging 1,874 square feet, significantly below the 2,549-square-foot home purchased on average by those trading up. Forty-six percent of first-timers bought homes smaller than 1,500 square feet.

The full report is available here.

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Waiting for Home Prices to Go Lower Can Cost You Money

August 20th, 2010 at 10:05 am by Rick Schutte

While it seems that waiting for the price of Whidbey Island homes to go lower before purchasing is a good idea, it may cost you more to wait than to purchase now. Trying to time the bottom of a market, to get the “best deal” is very hard to do. With interest rates at their lowest levels in quite some time, it is in the buyer’s best interest to negotiate their best deal now and lock in the mortgage rate that is currently available. It is recommended that you visit with your local Whidbey Island lender and get pre-qualified at today’s interest rate and go shopping for your dream home now instead of waiting for prices to go lower.

This video discusses and compares the differences of interest rates. Please feel free to call us with any questions or visit our website for further information.

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About Rick Schutte

Rick is the owner/designated broker of Coldwell Banker Koetje Real Estate and Koetje Property Management. He has been involved with the real estate industry on Whidbey Island for over 32 years. He is a past president of the NWMLS as well as a current board member of the North Puget Sound Association of Realtors. He has been designated by the National Association of Realtors as a Certified Real Estate Brokerage Manager as well as a Graduate of the Real Estate Institute. Rick can be reached at 360-675-5811 or cbk@WhidbeyRealEstate.com You can also check out his website at http://www.cbkoetje.com

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